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What to Bring Your Hosts This Holiday Season

What to Bring Your Hosts This Holiday Season


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Our favorite gourmet treats to give every kind of host this year

My family loves to have a little fun when bringing gifts to our hosts during the holidays (in addition to a proper present, of course).

For Bacon Lovers (with a Sense of Humor): Bacon Candies

My family loves to have a little fun when bringing gifts to our hosts during the holidays (in addition to a proper present, of course).

For Bacon Lovers (with a Sense of Humor): Bacon Candies

Bacon gummies or candies are just the thing that we’ll be toting to each person’s place. Consider them bacon-lover approved!

For the Trendsetter: French Macarons

With an ethereal lightness, a dainty crisp texture, and a satisfying filling that always seems to pack a flavor punch, these elegant sweets have been called the anti-cupcake by The New York Times. Once only available in France, the colorful treats have taken the U.S. by storm.

For the Trendsetter: French Macarons

These brightly colored treats can be found in most cities at French bakeries. They are made by hand with the utmost precision, and are just the thing to gift that hard-to-please person on your list.

For Your In-Laws: Italian Cantuccini and Vin Santo

If you’ve traveled to Tuscany, then you know of these delightfully crisp, nut-studded biscotti that are served with the after-dinner coffee, tea, or glass of dessert wine.

For Your In-Laws: Italian Cantuccini and Vin Santo

But you don’t have to travel back to Italy to get your fix, thanks to Dean and Deluca. Pair a tin of cookies with its best mate a bottle of vin santo.

For the Romantic Interest: Cheeses Fit for Bubbly

The holidays aren’t complete without a little indulgence, nor are the celebrations complete without something bubbly, so this gift is the perfect solution to that what-should-I-bring dilemma (After all, you don’t want something that screams commitment).

For the Romantic Interest: Cheeses Fit for Bubbly

Featuring a trio of carefully selected cheeses, crispy oatcakes, berry jam, and something sweet, is perfect to send ahead, with a bottle of bubbly of course.

For the Meat Lover: Salami Like They Make in Italy

Any meat lover or food lover will love receiving tasty Italian salami. It’s perfect to put on sandwiches, serve with cheese, or snack on in the kitchen.

For the Meat Lover: Salami Like They Make in Italy

Salami is actually a type of cured sausage that can be used for a wide variety of things, such as peperoni for pizza.

For Colleagues: Hearty Soup Mixes

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It’s a gift that is simple and delicious, with no pretense — gourmet dried soup mixes that are able to feed tons of people. And when the weather gets chilly, it’s nice to have all the ingredients for soup at the ready in the pantry.

For Colleagues: Hearty Soup Mixes

Make the hearty soup mixes in a mason jar to give your host a practical, homemade gift. You can also buy soup mixes premade at a wide variety of stores.

For the Working Parents: Sauces

Everyone has those moments where they're too tired to cook, but ordering in is just not an option. Whether it’s too late or you’re trying to save on money, homemade gourmet sauces are a fantastic food gift. With flavor-packed harvest tomatoes, simmer sauces are great for pasta and for dipping.

For the Working Parents: Sauces

Transform boneless, skinless chicken breasts into something that tastes quite indulgent by simmering them in a smoky bacon and Parmesan sauce. Added benefit? Your house will smell like you’ve been cooking all day.

For the Host Who Is Always Having a Party: Sweet and Savory Jams

Jams aren’t only for spreading on peanut butter or to go with crumpets at tea time. Homemade jams make a fantastic gift for party loving hosts, because they can easily be used to make impressive appetizers.

For the Host Who Is Always Having a Party: Sweet and Savory Jams

Try giving peach jam as an appetizer to place on top of cream cheese for cocktail hour, or use it to glaze chicken before grilling.

For the Host Who Is Always Having a Party: Sweet and Savory Jams

Blueberry jam is the perfect match for a lemony dessert or roast meat. We love strawberry-basil flavor on a scoop of ice cream for an instant dessert.

For the Francophile: Parisian Croissants, From Your Oven

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There is something so simple yet utterly satisfying about breaking open a fresh-baked croissant. The flaky layers, the buttery flavor, and perhaps the molten chocolate surprise inside make this the perfect Francophile treat.

For the Francophile: Parisian Croissants, From Your Oven

For the host who can't make it to Paris this year, even though they've been practicing their French, send them a bit of Paris with a package of croissants that can be baked for breakfast the next day or for tea.

For the Francophile: Parisian Croissants, From Your Oven

Bake up homemade croissants filled with surprise centers for your hostess! It's like taking a trip to the City of Lights without changing out of your pajamas.

For Families: Breakfast Staples

Wine or chocolates are a hostess-gift standard, so why not surprise hosts with something that will truly come in handy when they’re too tired to cook the next morning — breakfast staples.

For Families: Breakfast Staples

From all natural peanut butter and nut-studded granola to jams and waffle mix, there isn’t a bad choice to make, and you can even throw in some homemade goodies for a gift that truly suits the receiver’s taste.

For the Budget Traveler: A Trio of Olive Oils

For the food-obsessed host who'd love to taste their way around the globe, but can't, bring some of the world's most flavorful and unctuous oils to them this year.

For the Budget Traveler: A Trio of Olive Oils

Buy a set of olive oils or collect different brands from different farmers markets for your gift. Don’t forget to give this to your host with a fresh loaf of artisanal bread and balsamic vinegar for an olive oil tasting.

For the Person with a Sweet Tooth: Artisanal Caramel

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Caramel is caramel, but these caramels take the plain candy to a whole new level by putting a unique spin on traditional favorites. The pistachio caramel corn and dark chocolate caramel sauce are perfect for gifting.

For the Person with a Sweet Tooth: Artisanal Caramel

Save them for a snack, or combine them together, topping a scoop of ice cream with a drizzle of sauce and a garnish of caramel corn for crunch dessert is instantly served.


Holiday Recipes To-Go

Not hosting this year? It’s time to step up to the plate and be the best guest ever - by bringing a dish to the party that will not only make it easier on the host, but will ensure that you get an invite next year too!

A few things to consider – will the event have guests with special diets? Will there be any oven space or does your dish need to be ready before you arrive? You’ll also want to make sure your dish travels well. Sure, it’s a lot to ponder, but we have the recipes to make sure you win this holiday.


What to Bring Your Hosts This Holiday Season - Recipes

Anonymous wrote: My brother and his family live close to my family, as does my mother. My parents are getting older and are not in the best condition to host big holiday meals. For last seven years, we've hosted a big Christmas dinner at our house. My parents come, as does my brother, his wife and three kids. (My husband's family lives in Europe so they are not in town for the holidays.)

The issue is that my brother does not really care about having a big holiday dinner with family. He's never hosted one. His wife is from another culture, one that doesn't celebrate Christmas at all. So they'll show up at our house for Christmas, but my brother has made it clear that he'd be just as happy staying at home in his PJs. I don't think he has any concept of the work and expense that goes in to hosting a big holiday meal. Every year after Christmas dinner my DH and I feel like chumps, like we running a pop-up holiday restaurant with filet mignon and good wine and my brother doesn't really care if he comes or not! And when I mention it to my brother, he'll say "oh well, why don't we just have pizza then?"

We could just not invite my brother and his family. They'd probably be fine with it. But my mother would be so upset if we weren't all around the Christmas table together, like a Norman Rockwell painting. She thinks it's so important for my brother's kids to experience Christmas with the family etc.

This is all on you and your mom. Your brother does not give a shit, and has stated that very clearly. YOUR MOTHER thinks it is important for your brother's kids to experience Christmas with the family. Does he feel that way? You have complete control over the menu - you can serve filet mignon and good wine, or you can serve. pizza. The work and expense is what YOU make it.

I AM the sibling who never hosts holiday dinners. I live in a roach-infested tiny one-bedroom apartment. My tv is black and white. I do not own a table and chairs - all meals are eaten on my two-person loveseat. My kitchen is outfitted with apartment-sized oven and fridge. I have one foot of counter space on each side of the sink and that's it. No dishwasher.

So it would be VERY difficult to cook and clean up in my kitchen for a crowd, and near impossible to host.

I always bring something when I get invited to my brother's.

Anonymous wrote: My brother and his family live close to my family, as does my mother. My parents are getting older and are not in the best condition to host big holiday meals. For last seven years, we've hosted a big Christmas dinner at our house. My parents come, as does my brother, his wife and three kids. (My husband's family lives in Europe so they are not in town for the holidays.)

The issue is that my brother does not really care about having a big holiday dinner with family. He's never hosted one. His wife is from another culture, one that doesn't celebrate Christmas at all. So they'll show up at our house for Christmas, but my brother has made it clear that he'd be just as happy staying at home in his PJs. I don't think he has any concept of the work and expense that goes in to hosting a big holiday meal. Every year after Christmas dinner my DH and I feel like chumps, like we running a pop-up holiday restaurant with filet mignon and good wine and my brother doesn't really care if he comes or not! And when I mention it to my brother, he'll say "oh well, why don't we just have pizza then?"

We could just not invite my brother and his family. They'd probably be fine with it. But my mother would be so upset if we weren't all around the Christmas table together, like a Norman Rockwell painting. She thinks it's so important for my brother's kids to experience Christmas with the family etc.

I totally agree with this. Unfortunately, I think you just suck it up and deal for the sake of his children. Who knows, they may not like all the Christmas hoopla and eventually your brother and his family will just stop coming however, in the meantime, you are providing those children to a traditional family-type event that it sounds like they don't see much of at home.

I work a lot with high risk kids. They are the ones who tell me how much they covet family events like the ones you're talking about. I'm not saying it is the same with your brother's kids - they may be perfectly happy staying at home in their jammies, too - but it could be something they really crave, too.

Since you and your husband will be doing it anyway for your family and your folks, it isn't like there is a lot of additional work throwing in a few more people. I would keep on inviting your brother and his family and figure that this is your good deed.


Thanksgiving Recipes: Impress Your Family This Holiday Season!

Fall is finally here, and that means Thanksgiving is right around the corner. Every year we remind ourselves how thankful we are by spending the day surrounded by family, delicious food, and football on TV. We look forward to eating turkey, mashed potatoes, pumpkin pie, and other tasty treats. This year, Party Host Helpers is giving you some of our favorite Thanksgiving recipes for traditional dishes with a special twist.

Thanksgiving Recipes with a Twist

1.Cranberry Brie Bombs

Traditional: Biscuits, and Cranberry Sauce

These delicious cranberries and brie infused biscuits are a huge crowd-pleaser. It is sweet, savory, and cheesy. The best part is it only takes 20 minutes of prepping and 20 minutes in the oven for only a total of 40 minutes to make.

2. Maple Bacon Carrots

Traditional: Roasted carrots

Why have regular roasted carrots when you can wrap them in bacon first! These carrots steal the show when it comes to side dishes. The sweetness from the maple and salt from the bacon coats perfectly on a beautifully roasted carrot. This fun side dish only takes five minutes to prep and about 25 minutes in the oven.

3.Fried Mashed Potato Balls

Traditional: Mashed Potatoes

This recipe can be used as a delicious appetizer to hold over the crowd until dinner, or for Thanksgiving leftover recipes. If you want to use this as an appetizer just make some extra mashed potatoes and you’ll be ready to go! These golden-fried mashed potato balls are stuffed with cheese, bacon, and chives. It only takes 15 minutes to prep, and 10 minutes to fry them up to serve to your friends and family for Thanksgiving!

4. Whole Roasted Cabbage

Traditional: Roasted Turkey

Are you expecting any vegetarian guests? This mouthwatering dish ensures that all guests have their own main dish to look forward to whether it the turkey or a whole roasted cabbage! This vegetarian dish is tender and loaded with lots of flavors. Since it is roasted this recipe also includes how to make a gravy for it! It only takes 25 minutes to prep to make the vegetarian guests feel special, and an hour and thirty minutes to complete the whole dish!

We hope these recipes are able to make your Thanksgiving special. To make the holiday extra special, hire one of our staff to help out. It can be incredibly stressful hosting Thanksgiving which is where we come in. Our Helpers can pour wine, pass out apps, and help manage cooking. Best of all, we can take care of the dishes!

Contact Party Host Helpers to get in touch with your local Regional Director who can match the right helpers to meet your needs so you can enjoy time with your family this holiday season. Contact us today!


6 Showstopper Desserts to Impress Your Guests with This Holiday Season

There’s something about the winter holidays that just makes us want to splash out in the kitchen. Whether it’s with a gorgeous prime rib roast , an elegant pasta , or one of these knockout desserts, we collectively up our game. And why not? As is true of a gift festooned with ribbons, holly, bells and bows, a superior, towering dessert really ends a meal on a spectacular note. It’s the sort of thing people talk about in the days and years to come.

Here are a few of our favorite show-stoppers, some of which are quite easy to make. All you need to do is start daydreaming, then get baking.

1. Bundt Cake Tower with Brandy Caramel Sauce

The finishing touch on our winter holiday menu , this Bundt cake tower looks much more difficult to pull off than it is. The cakes’ batter contains traditional mouthwatering winter spices like cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and ginger, but the kicker has got to be the caramel sauce. Brown sugar, heavy whipping cream, butter and a splash of brandy mingle to absolutely magical effect. Spooned over the still-warm cake, it’s as satisfying and as wintry as it gets.

2. Caramel Crepe Cake

This riff on France’s gâteau mille crêpes is as beautiful as it is delicious. Instead of the pastry cream traditionally used to adhere the crepe discs, this caramel crepe cake uses a light, sweet whipped caramel cream. (It’s as good as it sounds.) If you’ve never had a crepe cake, it’s as though someone has dreamt up the exact perfect correct ratio of frosting to tender cake for every bite.

3. Blood Orange Chiffon Cake

When plotting the take-the-cake finish to your meal, remember that folks have likely indulged in heavy foods like meat, dairy and potatoes. They might not want to see a heavy chocolate concoction land with a thud in front of them. Enter this blood orange chiffon cake . Winter citrus is simply the best citrus, and blood oranges are in season this time of year. Take advantage of their natural dramatic qualities, and let them star in candied form. The cake itself is light-as-can-be, perfumed with both orange zest and orange blossom water, and the delicate frosting is a simple vanilla buttercream.

4. Peppermint Bark Pavlova

This stunning tower of meringue and chocolate is a peppermint bark pavlova , and it’s easier to make than it looks. Those who love pavlova are familiar with its melt-in-the-mouth qualities, which this dessert has in spades. Light, crisp meringue discs are layered with a sultry chocolate ganache, and the whole is topped with shards of peppermint bark . Serve the finished concoction with coffee or cocoa , and revel in all the compliments.

5. Lemon Genoise Cake with Meringue Frosting

If you’re dreaming of a winter wonderland, let this lemon genoise cake deliver the visual illusion of snow. Lemon curd sandwiches layers of moist, tender lemon zest-spiked cake, and the whole thing is swathed in meringue frosting. Carefully touched with flame to evoke swirls and spirals, the final product is somewhere between a van Gogh painting and a wintry landscape.

6. Bûche de Noël

Whether you call it a Yule log or bûche de Noël , its fans can agree on one thing: This dessert is gorgeous. Looking like an outtake from Snow White, and often covered in marzipan creatures, it is an iconic holiday treat. Thankfully, it’s not even as hard to bake as you’d think: Our recipe explains all the tricks of the trade in exacting detail. (Tip: A lot comes down to temperature.)

However you handle dessert this year, there’s no shame in sending these ideas to that aunt, cousin or friend who’s just pining to bring sweets this year.


Our 40 Best Vegetarian Holiday Recipes For A Meatless Feast

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Hearty vegetarian holiday recipes can be every bit as satisfying as the meaty dishes found on most menus. Crowd-pleasing classics like mashed potatoes get a silky upgrade by using a potato ricer. Cheesy green bean casseroles and hearty vegetarian pastas will leave your guests full and content. Don’t be afraid to try making new grains—cracked wheat, fonio, and quinoa make great hearty vegetarian holiday dishes with little preparation. We’ll help you set the perfect meatless table with our best vegetarian holiday recipes.

Potato and Cheese Tortelli with Porcini Mushrooms

Potato and Cheese Tortelli with Porcini Mushrooms

Swiss Chard Anzelottos with Pomodoro Sauce

From the tortelli family, anzelottos are rectangles often with ridged edges. “They’re made with a thicker, bright white dough of plain semola flour and hot water, which penetrates the proteins in the rustic flour more easily,” chef Evan Funke of Felix in Los Angeles says. Get the recipe for Swiss Chard Anzelottos with Pomodoro Sauce »

Celery Root Mashed Potatoes

Risotto Cacio e Pepe

Chef Massimo Bottura developed this recipe to utilize the nearly 1,000 wheels of Parmigiano-Reggiano damaged after earthquakes devastated the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy in 2012. Get the recipe for Risotto Cacio e Pepe »

Roasted Garlic Polenta “Mash” with Herbs and Mascarpone

Using a medium-coarsely ground cornmeal for this dish leaves some texture in the polenta while getting it as close to the consistency of soft, fluffy mashed potatoes as possible. (If using a more coarsely ground meal, increase both the cooking time and quantity of stock accordingly.) Get the recipe for Roasted Garlic Polenta “Mash” with Herbs and Mascarpone »

Broccoli Rabe with White Beans and Preserved Lemon

The bitter bite of broccoli rabe is tempered by creamy cannellini beans and brightened by salty preserved lemon. A quick and pretty 1-pan side dish, this is easy to scale up for a crowd unlike softer, more watery greens, rabe retains plenty of volume after cooking. Look for greens with healthy-looking stems and dark green florets. Get the recipe for Broccoli Rabe with White Beans and Preserved Lemon »

Layered Pumpkin and Cheese Gratin Squares (Boureki)

In Crete, boureki is a rich, layered dish typically consisting of potatoes and squash, often topped with a generous amount of cheese before baking. Boureki may be eaten at room temperature, but it is especially irresistible when the cheese is still warm. Get the recipe for Layered Pumpkin and Cheese Gratin Squares (Boureki) »

Spicy Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini

Spicy Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini

Sweet Potato Casserole with Pecan Crumble

This sweet potato casserole is an especially festive, over-the-top take on the Thanksgiving classic, topped with a crisp pecan crumble and dotted with marshmallows. Get the recipe for Sweet Potato Casserole with Pecan Crumble »

Shredded Collard Green Salad With Roasted Sweet Potatoes

Shredded Collard Green Salad With Roasted Sweet Potatoes

Lima Bean Gratin with Herbed Bread Crumbs

Think of this gratin as a meatless cassoulet, meant to accompany a roast, or as a stand alone, next to a tartly-dressed green salad. Get the recipe for Lima Bean Gratin with Herbed Bread Crumbs »

Cast-Iron Squash Pudding

This luscious, cakelike pudding, made with milk-poached butternut squash batter and crowned with caramel-drenched delicata, rides the line perfectly between side dish and dessert, “kind of like yams with marshmallows,” says Joe Beef’s Red Morin, who serves it with caramel sauce or sweetened whipped cream. For an easy caramel sauce and squash topping (pictured right), double or triple the quantities of delicata and granulated sugar, and repeat step 4 as needed. Or if you want to amp up the savory nature of the dish, nix the caramel and offer grated cheddar at the table. Get the recipe for Cast-Iron Squash Pudding »

Wild Rice with Roasted Buttered Onions

Wild Rice with Roasted Buttered Onions

Green Bean Casserole

With a creamy mushroom sauce and topped with flash fried onions, this holiday classic is the epitome of a crowd-pleasing casserole. Get the recipe for Green Bean Casserole »

Beet and Ricotta Gnocchi with Wilted Beet Greens and Aged Balsamic

For this Piedmontese dish, a drizzle of aged balsamic vinegar adds a tangy complexity. Get the recipe for Beet and Ricotta Gnocchi with Wilted Beet Greens and Aged Balsamic »

Cracked-Wheat Porridge with Hen of the Woods Mushrooms and Turnip-Top Salsa

Cracked Wheat Porridge with Mushrooms

Moroccan Carrots with Aleppo Pepper and Mint

Moroccan Carrots with Aleppo Pepper and Mint

Julia Child’s Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Thirty cloves of garlic go into this creamy side dish, adapted from Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking: Volume 1 (Alfred A. Knopf, 1961). The cloves are first blanched whole, which enhances their sweetness, then used to make a rich béchamel sauce that’s stirred into mashed potatoes with cream and parsley. Get the recipe for Julia Child’s Garlic Mashed Potatoes »

Macaroni au Gratin

The foundation of this creamy casserole is a classic mornay sauce, a béchamel sauce to which cheese has been added—in this case, comté, a French cheese with a complex, nutty flavor that melts beautifully. With lots of freshly grated nutmeg to season it and a golden, crunchy breadcrumb topping, it’s a luscious, satisfying side dish for the Thanksgiving table. The dish comes from Thomas Keller’s Bouchon Bistro, in the Napa Valley, where the staff makes it as part of their annual Thanksgiving dinner for veterans and their families.

Italian Bean and Vegetable Soup

In this traditional Lucchese soup, vegetables and beans are slow-cooked until little to no bite remains, making it a rustic, comforting dish. Be sure to give any tougher vegetables all the time they need to scompare, or disappear. The quantities are flexible, so use whatever you have on hand. Get the recipe for Italian Bean and Vegetable Soup »

Broiled Spaghetti Squash with Walnut-Miso Glaze

Chunks of Spaghetti squash reveal a beautifully yielding texture and a savory, subtle flavor that’s perfectly offset by a rich walnut-miso glaze. Prepare the squash ahead of time, and then pop them under the broiler for 3 minutes when you get to your host’s kitchen. Get the recipe for Broiled Spaghetti Squash with Walnut-Miso Glaze »

Swiss Cheese Soup

A traditional dish enjoyed year-round in the Alps of southern Switzerland, this homey soup takes its name from the mountain huts where it’s commonly made. Typically incorporating cheeses from the region, this version is fortified with L’Etivaz (which can be found at specialty cheese shops) and heavy cream. If you can’t find L’Etivaz, substitute Gruyère instead. Get the recipe for Swiss Cheese Soup »

Pomme Purée

Passing cooked potatoes through the fine holes of a potato ricer ensures a silky consistency for this ultrarich side. Get the recipe for Pomme Purée »

Cauliflower and Goat Cheese Souffles

Cauliflower and Goat Cheese Souffles

Open-Faced Lasagna with Acorn Squash and Smoked Caciocavallo

This layerless lasagna recipe from Philadelphia chef Marc Vetri uses an egg-rich dough, but store-bought fresh pasta sheets can be substituted.

Spiced Red Cabbage With Apples and Cranberries

Maitake Mushrooms with Red Chiles and Cilantro

Get the recipe for Maitake Mushrooms with Red Chiles and Cilantro »

Spaghettini with Carrots, Olives, and Red Endive

Carrot ribbons cooked al dente and lightly braised red endive add color to this simple vegetable-packed pasta dish, brightened with lots of lemon zest. Josita Hartanto of Berlin’s Lucky Leek uses multicolored carrots for a beautiful presentation. Get the recipe for Spaghettini with Carrots, Olives, and Red Endive »

Fried Eggplant with Tahini and Pomegranate Seeds

Fried Eggplant with Tahini and Pomegranate Seeds

Carrot and Pistachio Salad

Carrots are roasted before being topped with crunchy pistachios and a sweet fig vinaigrette in a simple salad from Eli and Max Sussman’s Classic Recipes for Modern People (Olive Press, 2015). Get the recipe for Carrot and Pistachio Salad »

Fonio Pilaf with Dates, Carrots, and Peanuts

Fort Rice Pilaf

Don’t waste your carrot tops

Roasted Carrot Salad with Burrata

Creamed Swiss Chard with Gorgonzola, Rye Bread Crumbs, and Walnuts

In this bulked-up version of the classic side dish, chard replaces spinach, and Gorgonzola adds depth and a creamier texture. Get the recipe for Creamed Swiss Chard with Gorgonzola, Rye Bread Crumbs, and Walnuts »

Farfalle with Cavolo Nero Pesto

In this rendition of traditional Genoese pesto, sweet and nutty cavolo nero (also known as Tuscan kale or Lacinato kale) is used in place of basil and pine nuts. Get the recipe for Farfalle with Cavolo Nero Pesto »

Fall Salad with Roasted Butternut Squash, Kale Chips, and Pomegranate Seeds

Crispy baked kale, sweet roasted squash, and peppery arugula and watercress are combined with pumpkin and pomegranate seeds in this colorful salad. Get the recipe foFall Salad with Roasted Butternut Squash, Kale Chips, and Pomegranate Seeds »

Pappardelle with Cauliflower and Mustard Brown Butter

Simple ingredients—chewy, charred cauliflower, fried capers and bread crumbs, and browned butter, bolstered by whole grain mustard—combine for the ultimate late-winter pasta. Get the recipe for Pappardelle with Cauliflower and Mustard Brown Butter »

Skillet-Braised Swiss Chard

Skillet-Braised Swiss Chard

Spinach Madeleine

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What to Bring Your Hosts This Holiday Season - Recipes

I am the sibling who hosts. None of our siblings ever offers to host or to help with costs. If is highly annoying. Even if we offered pizza for Christmas dinner, they wouldn’t help. It’s an entitlement thing. They just assume we are here to serve them.

So, we host when we feel like hosting and don’t when we don’t. Last year’s thanksgiving was glorious because we decided not to host : ). And we spent the day watching tv and eating.

How is wine not the easiest part of the whole thing? You just buy it.

Anonymous wrote: My brother and his family live close to my family, as does my mother. My parents are getting older and are not in the best condition to host big holiday meals. For last seven years, we've hosted a big Christmas dinner at our house. My parents come, as does my brother, his wife and three kids. (My husband's family lives in Europe so they are not in town for the holidays.)

The issue is that my brother does not really care about having a big holiday dinner with family. He's never hosted one. His wife is from another culture, one that doesn't celebrate Christmas at all. So they'll show up at our house for Christmas, but my brother has made it clear that he'd be just as happy staying at home in his PJs. I don't think he has any concept of the work and expense that goes in to hosting a big holiday meal. Every year after Christmas dinner my DH and I feel like chumps, like we running a pop-up holiday restaurant with filet mignon and good wine and my brother doesn't really care if he comes or not! And when I mention it to my brother, he'll say "oh well, why don't we just have pizza then?"

We could just not invite my brother and his family. They'd probably be fine with it. But my mother would be so upset if we weren't all around the Christmas table together, like a Norman Rockwell painting. She thinks it's so important for my brother's kids to experience Christmas with the family etc.

My thoughts are your brother doesn't care and has made that clear. Just because you care a lot doesn't mean he has to. Not sure what you think he should be doing differently. He probably feels like these things are a huge drag and he's doing his part by just showing up.

The problem is with you, your expectations, and your mother.

NP here. I agree with PP. The problem is with OP. OP's brother isn't interested in a big holiday celebration. It sounds like he and his wife don't even actually celebrate Xmas.


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Bring Some Magic to the Party — With Butterbeer

Okay, so Harry Potter may not necessarily be holiday-specific, but its legendary beverage of butterbeer sure is!

There are many different butterbeer recipes out there, but most come down to the same key ingredients — butterscotch schnapps, cream soda and a hard liquor of your choosing, generally vodka.

As any Harry Potter fan will tell you — and you can bet there’ll be at least one at your gathering! — butterbeer is associated with a feeling of warmth and cheer. If that’s a feeling you’d like to create at your holiday shindig, then bring some magic to the party with cold, room-temp or hot butterbeer.

Keep Your Guests Toasty with a Hot Toddy

Another fun, warming drink to try out at your event is the hot toddy. Just as its name suggests, this tasty cocktail is a good one to hand those guests who just walked in from the cold.

Hot toddies are great holiday drinks because they combine the heat of boiled water, the blood-pumping effects of bourbon and the coziness of a cinnamon stick garnish. What more could your guests ask for in a beverage?

Liven Things Up with Peppermint & Chocolate

Two of America’s favorite holiday treats are peppermint and chocolate. So why not find an excuse to use both at your event?

The peppermint white mocha martini is as good as it gets. This drink is a little bit fancier than your average light beer, so it should come as no surprise that it’ll take a little more prep time than tapping a keg. But if you really want to wow your crowd and show off your festive bartending skills, this drink is worth the effort.

Appease the Coffee Fiends

No matter the season, coffee lovers always run rampant. To appease this crowd and mix up your drink options, try offering iced Irish coffee .

Not only will Irish coffee appease the coffee fiends, but serving it on ice also gives a cold drink option to those guests who always run hot. You know the ones — the people who walk in to the heated house, throw off their coats and say “Geez, it’s toasty in here!” while everyone else proceeds to shiver and recover from the cold weather they just escaped.

Save the day With a Bowl of Cranberry Moscato Punch

Making a variety of drinks doesn’t have to be too pricy, and an especially useful trick is to make one drink in bulk for all to enjoy. Cranberry Moscato punch is a great choice to have as your main beverage because it’s quick and easy to make, neutral yet delicious and inexpensive.

As with all of these drinks, you can always tweak the recipe to meet your taste preferences. To do that, it helps to know a little bit more about the alcohols you’re using.

For instance, when determining how best to mix this punch recipe for your party, it will help you to know more about the different types of Moscato . That way, you can choose the one that’s right for you and your crowd.


Fortina Hosts Holiday Themed Miracle Pop-Up Bars in Stamford & Armonk

Does anyone remember the epically successful and brilliantly over the top kitschy Miracle Bar pop-up from last holiday season? If you do, you'll be excited to hear that Miracle Bar is coming to Fortina, Thanksgiving eve through New Years 2016. "Miracle Bar will literally vomit Christmas and Hanukah," says Fortina's John Nealon. This holiday pop-up will take over the mezzanine in Fortina Stamford as well as a patio tent in Armonk.

Guest mixologists, custom holiday glassware, tons of tinsel, menorahs and cocktails with names like “ The Reindeer’s Revolt,” will created a uniquely fun drinking experience. Pair this with Fortina pizza and you've got yourself a party.

Artist, Raffa Dowling, who created last year's aesthetic is back for 2016, and will be in charge of crafting the pop-ups's rather unique design. Also John McNulty, who brought Miracle to CT (originally a NYC concept) is now playing for team Fortina and will be in on the fun.

We will bring you more as Fortina gets closer to opening their holiday "Miracles."


Holiday Gifts for the Hostess with the Mostess

You've picked a show-stopping dress and the hubby's got his perfect tie ready to go, but have you put any thought into what kind of gift you can offer the host or hostess of your next holiday party? Cookies or holiday sweets might be the quick and easy go-to throughout December, but the key to wowing your host or hostess with the perfect sign of your appreciation isn't necessarily through his or her sweet tooth. There are a number of small, thoughtful gifts you can bring along to all of your upcoming holiday parties as a show of good cheer. Grab one of these nine sweet gifts and solidify your status as the holiday season's most-wanted guest.

A Healthy Appetizer If there are 20 couples invited to a party, chances are at least half of them are bringing cookies. Round out the meal by contributing a favorite healthy snack for guests to munch on throughout the night. Add a touch of fancy to the festivities with this deceptively simple smoked salmon dip or go for a throwback with these bacon-wrapped water chestnuts.

Poinsettia Next to the evergreen tree, this has to be the most sought-after plant of the holiday season. Skip traditional flowers and opt for this colorful plant instead. Your gift will be right at home on your host's table, no vase necessary.

Mug No matter if they're Team Coffee, Team Tea or even Team Hot Chocolate, chances are a mug is going to be put to use during the cold winter months. Avoid holiday-themed designs, and instead, choose a fun pattern or a clever quote to keep your host feeling warm and fuzzy all year round.

A Jar of Locally Made Honey or Jam If you're heading to a party out of town, bring a bit of home along for the ride. Offering your host or hostess a jar of a locally made product is not only a conversation starter, but it will also introduce them to a part of your world.

Nuts + a Festive Nutcracker Is there anyone among us who doesn't adore a solid nutcracker? They're so darn festive it's insane. A holiday without a nutcracker is like Thanksgiving without a single decorative gourd. Search for a classic or clever nutcracker, then pair it with a nicely packaged bag of whole walnuts, which have been shown to keep your heart healthy.

Amaryllis Bulb Over the poinsettia? The bright red bulb and green stem are perfect for the holiday season, plus many stores sell the beautiful bulb in a box for convenient travel. Your hosts will enjoy this gorgeous flower for months to come.

Mix for a Healthy Bread Cookies might be the most-baked item in December, but there is nothing better than enjoying a warm, healthy and homemade bread on chilly mornings. Find a recipe you love&mdashlike this moist banana bread&mdashpop the mix of dry ingredients in a trendy mason jar with the full recipe attached and your host or hostess might just make sure your wine glass is full all night long.

Coffee Beans Say, "I recognize and appreciate that you stayed up late nights baking and planning and running errands for this party," without actually saying anything at all by offering your host or hostess the gift of caffeine. Hit up your local coffee shop to find a unique bean that they can look forward to drinking after the festivities end.

Bath Bomb Because planning a party and working the room all night is tough work, reward them for a job well done with a nicely wrapped and beautifully scented bath bomb.


Delicious Holiday Drink Recipes That You and Your Guests Will Love

This holiday season, you want an excuse to bring together all of your favorite people. You feel like setting the stage for a shared good time, so you’ve elected to host a holiday party. Go you!

But whether you’re a first-time party host or you’re throwing your twentieth annual Christmas bash, it never hurts to give your guests something new to look forward to. This season, why not make it happen with a few fun holiday drinks? So rather than relying solely on eggnog to satisfy those thirsty guests, try throwing some new festive cocktails into the mix. Here are seven ideas to get you started.


Watch the video: Peggy March - Weihnachten lebt 1993 (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Jedadiah

    Give Where can I find?

  2. Dikasa

    Yes, this is our modern world and I'm probably afraid that nothing can be done about it :)



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