Latest recipes

China Takes a Step Toward Classifying Its Wines

China Takes a Step Toward Classifying Its Wines



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The fifth-largest wine producer in the world has no viable appellation system… yet

A new wine classification system is coming to China.

The China Alcoholic Drinks Association, the country’s alcoholic beverage trade organization, is set to award the trademark designation of “estate wine” to some 16 Chinese wine producers, most of them in the Xinjiang, Hebei, and Ningxia regions of northern China.

The wineries, which include such properties as Château Bolongbao, Château Zhongfei, and Xinjiang Ruitai Qing Lin Wine, must own or control their vineyards; produce and bottle their offerings on site; limit their vineyard yields; and meet specific quality standards.

The Chinese wine industry has exploded in the past 20 years, with plantings of classic European grape varieties like cabernet sauvignon, merlot, marselan (a grenache-cabernet sauvignon cross), and chardonnay. China now has the second-largest vineyard area in the world, comprising about 830,000 hectares (2,050,974 acres) — second only to Spain, with a million hectares (2,471,054 acres). It is also the fifth-largest wine producer, after only Italy, Spain, France, and the U.S.

The Chinese government had earlier given appellation-like GI (Geographical Indication) designations to several wine regions, but the rules governing them are nowhere near as rigorous as those for France’s appellation contrôlée or the U.S. American Viticultural Area classifications. According to Li Demai, an associate professor of wine tasting and enology at Beijing Agricultural College, writing on DecanterChina.com, the government classification “had little actual effect in the market because it is far less forceful than the trademark law.”


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.


German wine chateau sees great potential in China

Visitors inquire about German wines at a wine expo in Beijing. [Photo by Nan Shan/For China Daily]

FRANKFURT-For Schloss Reinhartshausen, a centuries-old wine chateau situated in the Rheingau region in Germany, China will be a key market for white wine in the future as its consumers become more sophisticated in their drinking preferences.

Considering the huge market potential, it is relevant to have an agreement on geographical indications in place between the European Union and China, the chateau's export manager Alexander Lorch told Xinhua News Agency in a recent interview.

Founded in 1337, Schloss Reinhartshausen is one of the oldest wineries in the world. About 90 percent of its vineyards around the chateau are planted with Riesling grapes, destined to be made into Germany's renowned Riesling wine.

"The origin of Riesling is most important to the wine itself, the style, and the character. It is important that consumers are aware of what they are purchasing," Lorch said.

For Lorch, Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and the country is shifting from heavy red wine consumption toward a more diversified demand."We see that there is improvement, there is interest and there is experimenting," Lorch said.

He said there exists a large market for white wine in China. "When you have a very strong red wine consumption by history, and then you start to find there is more than red wine, there is white, there is Riesling, there are other varietals," he said.

Riesling would be a good choice for those who prefer less acidity and more fruitiness, Lorch said, adding that the wine accompanies an assortment of dishes without overwhelming the food.

"The white wines will have a great future, at least with the younger population of China," he said.

Although the German domestic market takes up 60 percent to 70 percent of the chateau's sales, China is becoming its most important export market, Lorch said.

"It's important for all of us at Reinhartshausen to really take the chance and develop step by step the Chinese market," he added.

The chateau has already set foot in China's metropolitan areas including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Guangdong province, and is expanding.

It was also a frequent presence at wine expos in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shanghai before the pandemic.

Lorch said China reopened earlier than other markets in the world after the pandemic lockdowns, another positive factor in its market potential.

He hopes the chateau will welcome Chinese visitors again, possibly from 2022 on, to experience the chateau and the estate.