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Oat 'milk' recipe

Oat 'milk' recipe


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Creamy, vegan 'milk' made with oats and dates. Cover 'milk' and keep in the fridge for up to 1 week. Shake well before use.

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 2

  • 75g quick oats
  • water to cover
  • 700ml water
  • 2 small dates, pitted

MethodPrep:5min ›Extra time:40min soaking › Ready in:45min

  1. Soak oats in enough cool water to cover them. Cover and set aside for 30 minutes.
  2. Drain the oats using a sieve. Combine oats, 700ml of water and dates in a large bowl. Allow to sit undisturbed until skin on the dates softens, 10 to 15 minutes.
  3. Transfer oat mixture to a blender. Pulse the mixture a few times and then leave on medium-high speed until completely smooth, about 1 minute. Drain 'milk' through muslin cloth to remove all solids. Serve cold or warm.

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Unsweetened Oat Milk Recipe (Vegan, Gluten Free, Pantry Staple)

Unsweetened, Unflavored or Plain oat milk works great in both savory and sweet dishes! I use it in baked goods in place of milk, and also in savory dishes in place of cream. It has a very mild flavor and tastes great.


50 Things to Make with Oats

1. Blueberry-Oat Scone Loaf Whisk 2 cups flour with 2/3 cup rolled oats, 1/4 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Work in 6 tablespoons diced cold butter with your fingers, then stir in 1 cup heavy cream to make a dough. Fold in 1 cup blueberries. Transfer to a parchment-lined 9-by-5-inch loaf pan, brush with more heavy cream and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon each turbinado sugar and rolled oats. Bake at 400 degrees F until golden, 35 to 45 minutes.

2. Carrot Oat Muffins Whisk 1 cup all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup each oat flour, rolled oats and raisins, 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon each ground ginger and cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk 3/4 cup brown sugar, 2 eggs, 1 1/4 cups grated carrots (about 2), 1/4 cup each sour cream, vegetable oil and sweetened shredded coconut and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Fold the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Divide among 12 lined muffin cups. Bake at 350 degrees F until a toothpick comes out clean, 20 to 25 minutes.

3. Chocolate Chip–Oat Pancakes Whisk 3/4 cup whole-wheat flour, 1/2 cup each all-purpose flour and rolled oats, 3 tablespoons brown sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon each cinnamon and salt in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk 1 1/4 cups milk, 1 egg, 4 tablespoons melted butter and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Whisk the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Cook 1/4 cupfuls of the batter in a hot buttered skillet sprinkle with chocolate chips before flipping.

4. Homemade Muesli Combine 2 cups rolled oats and 1 cup raw pepitas in a medium skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until toasted, 10 minutes. Let cool. Mix with 1/3 cup each chopped pitted dates, chopped dried apricots and raisins and ¼ cup each hemp seeds and salted sunflower seeds.

5. Instant Pot Oatmeal Combine 1 cup steel-cut oats, 3 cups water and 1/4 teaspoon salt in an Instant Pot. Put on the lid, making sure the steam valve is in the sealing position, and set to cook on high pressure for 5 minutes. When the time is up, let the pressure release naturally, about 20 minutes. Remove the lid and stir well.

6. Multigrain Oatmeal Combine 1 cup each rolled oats and buckwheat groats with 1/2 cup each quinoa, millet and oat bran store in a quart-size jar. To cook: Bring 1 1/2 cups water to a simmer in a small saucepan with 1/2 cup of the oat mixture and a pinch of salt. Reduce the heat to low, cover and cook until tender, 8 to 10 minutes.

Strawberries-and-Cream Oatmeal (No. 7)

Strawberries-and-Cream Oatmeal (No. 7)

7. Strawberries-and-Cream Oatmeal Cook 1/2 cup rolled oats as the label directs. Stir in 1/4 cup half-and-half, 1 tablespoon each butter and sugar and 3 tablespoons crushed freeze-dried strawberries. Top with chopped fresh strawberries.

Loaded Overnight Oats (No. 8)

Loaded Overnight Oats (No. 8)

8. Loaded Overnight Oats Mix 1/2 cup rolled oats, 2/3 cup milk, 1/3 cup plain yogurt, 1 tablespoon each ground flaxseed, mini chocolate chips and nut butter, 2 teaspoons brown sugar and a pinch each of cinnamon and salt in a jar. Refrigerate overnight. Stir and top with raisins, sunflower seeds, chopped nuts and toasted shredded coconut.

9. Pumpkin-Ginger Overnight Oats Mix 1/2 cup rolled oats, 2/3 cup milk, 1/4 cup pumpkin puree, 1/3 cup plain yogurt, 1 tablespoon each ground flaxseed and chopped crystallized ginger, 2 teaspoons maple syrup and a pinch each of pumpkin pie spice and salt in a jar. Refrigerate overnight. Stir and top with pepitas and more crystallized ginger.

10. Ginger Oatmeal Bowl Bring 1/2 cup water, 1/4 cup each brown sugar and honey and 6 smashed thick slices ginger to a boil in a saucepan reduce the heat and simmer until slightly thickened, 5 to 8 minutes. Cook 1/2 cup quick-cooking oats as the label directs, then stir in 1/4 cup coconut milk beverage. Drizzle with some of the ginger syrup and top with diced mangoes.

11. Cinnamon-Apple Oatmeal Bowl Bring 2 tablespoons each water, butter and sugar to a simmer in a small saucepan with 2 diced peeled apples and 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon cook until the apples are tender, 15 minutes. Meanwhile, cook 1/2 cup quick-cooking oats as the label directs. Top with some of the apples, toasted sliced almonds, dried cranberries, maple syrup and cinnamon.

12. Chocolate–Peanut Butter Oatmeal Cook 1/2 cup quick-cooking oats with 2 tablespoons sweetened cocoa powder as the label directs. Top with peanut butter and maple syrup.

13. Baked Banana Brulee Oatmeal Toss 2 cups rolled oats, 1/3 cup brown sugar, 1 teaspoon each cinnamon and baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk 1 3/4 cups milk, 1 egg and 3 tablespoons melted butter. Mix the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Transfer to an oiled 8-inch square baking dish and top with 3 to 4 small bananas (halved lengthwise). Bake at 350 degrees F until set, about 35 minutes. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup granulated sugar and caramelize with a kitchen torch.

14. Oat Brittle Toast 2 cups rolled oats and 1/2 cup sliced almonds in 3 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat, stirring, until golden, about 5 minutes. Combine 1 1/2 cups sugar and 1/2 cup water in a separate large skillet and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until deep golden, 10 to 15 minutes. Working quickly, stir in the oat mixture and 1/8 teaspoon almond extract, then 1/2 teaspoon baking soda. Spread in a thin layer on an oiled baking sheet and let cool. Break into pieces.

15. Caramelized Oats Bring 4 tablespoons salted butter and 1/4 cup golden syrup (such as Lyle’s) to a boil in a small saucepan and cook 1 minute. Stir in 1 cup rolled oats, then spread in a thin layer on a baking sheet. Bake at 325 degrees, stirring once, until browned, 15 to 20 minutes. Let cool completely. Serve over yogurt.

16. Strawberry Oat Bark Make Caramelized Oats (No. 15). Melt 12 ounces chopped semisweet chocolate in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water, stirring, until smooth. Remove from the heat and stir in 4 more ounces chopped chocolate until smooth. Spread in a thin layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet and sprinkle with the caramelized oats and 1/4 cup crushed freeze-dried strawberries. Freeze until firm, 1 hour. Break into pieces. Freeze until serving.

17. Savory Granola Cook 2 chopped garlic cloves and 1 chopped shallot in 1/4 cup olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat until just softened, 2 minutes. Whisk 1/4 cup olive oil, 1 egg white and 1 tablespoon maple syrup in a large bowl. Add 2 cups rolled oats, 1/2 cup each steel-cut oats and chopped walnuts, 2 tablespoons grated pecorino, 1 tablespoon kosher salt, 2 teaspoons fresh thyme and the garlic mixture toss. Spread on a baking sheet and bake at 325 degrees F, stirring once, until dry and toasted, 35 to 40 minutes. Let cool.

18. Butternut Squash–Oat Gratin Toss 1/4 cup Scottish oats with 1 tablespoon each grated parmesan, breadcrumbs and melted butter and 1/4 teaspoon each chopped thyme and kosher salt. Simmer 2 cups heavy cream with 3 cups thinly sliced butternut squash and 1/2 teaspoon each nutmeg, chopped thyme and kosher salt in a saucepan over medium-high heat until tender, 8 minutes. Transfer to a baking dish and bake at 450 degrees F until browned around the edges, 15 minutes. Sprinkle with the oat mixture and broil until golden.

19. Cheesy Oat-Corn Casserole Toss 2 cups rolled oats with 1 teaspoon each baking powder and salt. In a separate bowl, whisk 1 egg with one 15-ounce can cream-style corn, 1 cup milk and 2 tablespoons melted butter. Mix the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, then fold in 1/2 cup each grated cheddar and pepper jack. Transfer to an oiled 8-inch square baking dish and top with 1/4 cup each grated cheddar and pepper jack. Bake at 350 degrees F until just set, about 35 minutes. Top with scallions.

20. Mushroom Ris-Oat-To Cook 12 ounces sliced mixed mushrooms in olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until browned, 8 minutes remove. Add 1 cup steel-cut oats, 1 minced large shallot and 1 tablespoon each chopped thyme and olive oil to the skillet cook, tossing, until lightly toasted, 1 minute. Add 3 1/2 cups chicken broth, 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt and a pinch of pepper. Simmer, stirring often, until tender and saucy, 10 to 15 minutes. Stir in the mushrooms, 3 cups baby spinach, 1/2 cup grated parmesan and 2 tablespoons butter.

21. Oat-Crusted Chicken Tenders Mix 1 cup Scottish oats, 1/4 cup grated pecorino and 2 teaspoons each Italian seasoning and salt. Dredge 1 pound chicken tenders in oat flour, then in beaten egg and then in the oat mixture. Heat 1/2 inch vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Fry the chicken in batches until golden, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Drain on paper towels. Season with salt.

22. Oat–Black Bean Burgers Sauté 1 diced small onion, 1 diced carrot and 2 cups sliced cremini mushrooms in 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat until browned, 6 minutes. Stir in 2 teaspoons chili powder and one 14-ounce can black beans (drained) season with salt and pepper. Pulse in a food processor with 1 cup quick-cooking oats until combined, then form into 4 patties. Refrigerate 1 hour. Dust both sides with flour and cook in vegetable oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until browned, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Serve on buns with toppings.

23. Cheesy Oats Bring 2 cups each water and chicken broth to a simmer in a medium saucepan. Whisk in 1 cup Scottish oats and simmer, stirring, until tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Stir in 1 cup grated monterey jack, 1 ounce cream cheese, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 teaspoon kosher salt and a few grinds of pepper. Stir until melted. Top with parsley.

24. Fried Oat Cakes Make Cheesy Oats (No. 23). Spread in an 8-inch square baking dish and refrigerate until firm, at least 4 hours or overnight. Cut into 16 squares and dust with instant flour (such as Wondra). Pan-fry in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat with vegetable oil, turning once, until well browned, 4 to 5 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Season with salt.

25. Oat Fettuccine Process 1 cup each oat flour and whole-wheat flour in a food processor to combine. With the machine running, drizzle in 3 lightly beaten eggs. Process until the dough comes together when pinched. Turn out, gather into a ball and knead, dusting with flour if needed, until smooth, about 5 minutes. Wrap in plastic and let rest 1 hour. Roll out and cut the dough into fettuccine with a pasta machine. Cook in salted boiling water until al dente, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and toss with butter and parmesan.

26. Oat Pilaf Cook 1 minced shallot in 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over high heat until tender, 2 minutes. Add 1 cup steel-cut oats (rinsed) and cook until toasted and dry, about 2 minutes. Add 1 1/2 cups chicken broth, 4 thyme sprigs and 1 bay leaf bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to low and cook until the liquid is absorbed and the oats are tender, 18 minutes. Let sit, covered, 10 minutes, then fluff.

Spicy Oatmeal Bowls with Eggs (No.27)

Spicy Oatmeal Bowls with Eggs (No.27)

27. Spicy Oatmeal Bowls with Eggs Cook 1/2 cup steel-cut oats as the label directs. Stir in 1 chopped chipotle in adobo plus 1 teaspoon sauce from the can season with salt. Top with halved soft-boiled eggs, diced avocado, pico de gallo and cilantro.

28. Indian Spiced Lentils and Oats Toast 1 cup rolled oats in a dry skillet over medium-high heat, stirring, 5 minutes. Cook 1 teaspoon each cumin seeds, garam masala, grated ginger and grated garlic and 1/2 minced red jalapeño in 2 tablespoons butter in a large saucepan over medium-high heat until sizzling, 1 minute. Add 3 cups water, 1/2 cup dried red lentils and 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt. Cover and simmer until tender, 5 minutes. Uncover, stir in the toasted oats and simmer, 2 minutes. Let stand, covered, 5 minutes. Stir in 1/2 cup chopped cilantro and season with salt and pepper.

29. Oat Biscuits Whisk 1 1/2 cups flour, 1 cup quick-cooking oats, 2 tablespoons baking powder, 1 tablespoon sugar and 1 teaspoon salt. Work in 1 stick diced cold butter with your fingers, then stir in 1 cup buttermilk to make a shaggy dough. Press into a 4-by-12-inch rectangle on a floured surface, then fold in half and press into a rectangle again. Cut into twelve 2-inch squares, brush with buttermilk and sprinkle with more oats. Bake on a baking sheet at 425 degrees F until light golden brown, about 15 minutes.

30. Spiced Raisin Oat Pudding Combine 1 1/2 cups each sweetened coconut milk beverage and heavy cream, 1 cup rolled oats, 1/4 cup each raisins and sugar, 2 teaspoons vanilla, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon each cardamom and nutmeg and a pinch of salt in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until thickened and the oats are just tender, about 2 minutes let cool. Refrigerate at least 1 hour.

31. Toasted Oat Panna Cotta Toast 1 cup steel-cut oats in a dry skillet over medium-high heat, stirring, 5 minutes. Soak the oats in 2 cups heavy cream, 2 hours. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve, pressing discard the oats. Simmer 2 more cups heavy cream with 1/2 cup brown sugar and 1/2 teaspoon cardamom, stirring, 1 minute. Sprinkle one 1/4-ounce packet unflavored gelatin over 1/4 cup cold water let sit 1 minute, then stir into the cardamom cream. Stir in the oat cream. Divide among 8 ramekins coated with cooking spray. Refrigerate until set, 3 hours.

32. Chocolate Tart with Oat Crust Pulse 1 cup each flour and quick-cooking oats, 1/3 cup sugar and 1 teaspoon salt in a food processor until finely ground. Add 1 1/2 sticks diced cold butter and 1 egg yolk process until clumpy. Press into a 9-inch round tart pan refrigerate until firm, 1 hour. Bake at 350 degrees F until golden, 45 minutes. Let cool. Pour 1 cup hot heavy cream over 8 ounces chopped semisweet chocolate and whisk until smooth. Pour into the crust. Refrigerate until set, 2 hours.

Oat-Stuffed Baked Pears (No. 33)

Oat-Stuffed Baked Pears (No. 33)

33. Oat-Stuffed Baked Pears Mix 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 cup each brown sugar, chopped dried cherries and chopped pecans, 3 tablespoons softened butter and 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon. Halve 4 ripe pears through the stem and scoop out the seeds, then mound the oat mixture in the centers. Bake in a baking dish at 375 degrees F until the pears are tender and the oats are browned, about 25 minutes.

34. Oatmeal-Raisin Cookies Whisk 1 cup each rolled oats and flour, 1 teaspoon cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoon each baking soda and salt. In a separate bowl, beat 1 stick softened butter and 3/4 cup light brown sugar with a mixer until fluffy. Beat in 1 egg and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Reduce the mixer speed to low and beat in the flour mixture and 3/4 cup raisins until combined. Drop large scoops of dough about 2 inches apart onto parchment-lined baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees F until lightly browned, 17 to 19 minutes.

35. Oatmeal-Raisin Bars Make the dough for Oatmeal-Raisin Cookies (No. 34), adding 1/2 cup each chocolate chips, sweetened shredded coconut and chopped pecans with the raisins. Press the dough into a foil-lined 9-inch square baking dish and bake at 350 degrees F until lightly browned, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool. Cut into bars.

36. Coconut-Cashew Granola Bars Toast 3 cups rolled oats in a large dry skillet over medium-high heat, stirring, 5 minutes. Bring 1/2 cup each honey and light brown sugar, 1/3 cup unrefined coconut oil and 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt to a boil in a large saucepan, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Stir in the toasted oats, 1 cup chopped salted cashews and 3/4 cup each sweetened shredded coconut and dried blueberries. Press the mixture into an oiled foil-lined 9-by-13-inch baking dish and bake at 350 degrees F until lightly browned, 20 minutes. Let cool. Cut into bars.

37. Brown Butter Granola Heat 1 stick butter in a small skillet over medium heat until browned, 5 to 8 minutes transfer to a large bowl and whisk in 1/3 cup each maple syrup and brown sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Stir in 2 cups each rolled oats and crisp rice cereal and 1 cup chopped pecans spread on an oiled rimmed baking sheet and bake at 325 degrees F until dry and toasted, 35 to 40 minutes. Let cool, then break into clusters.

38. Granola Crispy Treats Make Brown Butter Granola (No. 37). Melt 4 tablespoons butter, 4 cups mini marshmallows, 1 teaspoon vanilla and a pinch of salt in a pot over medium-high heat, stirring, until smooth. Stir in the granola. Transfer to an oiled foil-lined 9-inch square baking dish press into an even layer. Let cool. Cut into bars.

39. No-Bake Oat Cookies Toast 1 cup quick-cooking oats in a dry skillet over medium-high heat, stirring, 5 minutes. Microwave 3/4 cup cookie butter and 2 tablespoons butter in a microwave-safe bowl in 30-second intervals, stirring, until smooth let cool slightly. Stir in the toasted oats, 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut and 1/4 cup mini chocolate chips. Roll heaping tablespoonfuls into balls and arrange on baking sheets gently flatten. Refrigerate until firm, 1 to 2 hours.

40. Gluten-Free Oatmeal Cookies Pulse 3/4 cup Scottish oats, 1/4 cup each almond flour, coconut flour and tapioca starch and 1/2 teaspoon each baking soda and salt in a food processor until finely ground. Whisk 10 tablespoons melted butter, 1 egg, 3 tablespoons softened cream cheese, 1/2 cup dark brown sugar, 1/4 cup granulated sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla in a large bowl. Stir in the oat mixture and 1 cup chocolate chips. Refrigerate at least 6 hours. Drop tablespoonfuls of dough onto parchment-lined baking sheets. Bake at 375 degrees until browned around the edges, 14 to 16 minutes.

41. Chocolate-Cherry Oat Bars Toast 1 1/4 cups quick-cooking oats in a dry skillet over medium-high heat, stirring, 5 minutes. Soak 1 cup pitted dates in hot water for 10 minutes drain and pulse in a food processor with 1/4 cup each honey and almond butter and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the toasted oats, 1/2 cup each chopped salted roasted almonds and dried cherries and 1/4 cup mini chocolate chips. Press the dough into an oiled foil-lined 8-inch square pan and sprinkle with mini chocolate chips. Refrigerate until firm, 1 hour. Cut into bars.

42. Apple-Fig Crumble Mix 3/4 cup rolled oats, 1/2 cup each light brown sugar and flour and 1/2 teaspoon each cinnamon and salt cut in 6 tablespoons cold butter until crumbly. In a separate bowl, toss 3 pounds chopped peeled apples with 1/2 cup each sugar and chopped dried Mission figs, 3 tablespoons flour, 2 tablespoons finely chopped crystallized ginger, the juice of 1 lemon, 1 teaspoon vanilla and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Transfer to a 9-by-13-inch baking dish and top with the oat mixture. Bake at 375 degrees F until browned, 30 to 40 minutes.

43. Oat Power Balls Beat 1 cup each rolled oats and crunchy peanut butter with 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut and 1/3 cup each ground flaxseed, chopped dried cranberries and honey. Roll into 1-inch balls, then roll in ground flaxseed. Freeze until firm.

44. Coffee-Oat Biscotti Whisk 1 cup flour, 1/2 cup each rolled oats and sugar, 1/4 cup oat bran and 1/2 teaspoon each baking powder and salt in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk 1/4 cup each melted butter and water, 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder and 1/2 teaspoon coffee extract. Mix the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Shape into a 3-by-8-inch log on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake at 350 degrees F until firm, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes, then slice 1/2 inch thick. Arrange cut-sides up and bake, turning once, until dry, 20 to 25 minutes.

45. Toasted Oat Tea Toast 1/4 cup steel-cut oats with 1 cinnamon stick in a dry skillet over medium heat, 8 minutes. Steep in 2 cups boiling water, covered, 3 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve. Sweeten with honey.

46. Oat Milk Soak 1 cup rolled oats in water for 1 hour, then drain and rinse. Transfer the oats to a blender and add 3 cups water and a pinch of salt. Blend until finely ground. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve, then line the sieve with cheesecloth and strain again. Refrigerate until ready to use. Stir before using.

47. Chocolate Oat Milk Make Oat Milk (No. 46), blending in 2 tablespoons sugar and 1 tablespoon Dutch-process cocoa powder.

48. Oat Milk Steamer Heat 1 cup oat milk (see No. 46) with 1 tablespoon honey and 1/8 teaspoon vanilla in a saucepan over medium-low heat, whisking. Top with nutmeg.

49. Oat-Almond Shaker Shake 2/3 cup oat milk (see No. 46) with 1/3 cup sweetened almond milk, 1/2 teaspoon agave and 1/4 teaspoon each cinnamon and vanilla in a cocktail shaker. Strain into an ice-filled glass.

50. Tropical Oat Smoothie Combine 3/4 cup oat milk (see No. 46) with 2 tablespoons each quick-cooking oats and unsweetened shredded coconut in a blender and let sit 5 minutes. Add one 3.5-ounce packet frozen pureed dragon fruit, 1/2 cup frozen pineapple chunks and 1 banana blend until smooth.


Oat 'milk' recipe - Recipes

Being someone who is intolerant to dairy, I had to find an alternative to milk so that I was able to make all the baked goods I wanted. When I cut out dairy, one of the first things I did was visit the supermarket to have a look at the range of different nut milks. But when I looked at their ingredient lists, I saw that a lot of them are just full of additives.

Although I have conquered the art of making a great almond milk, oat milk for me is still the one! For a whole host of reasons, I choose to use oat milk in a lot of my recipes. I can’t get enough of it for lots of reasons. Firstly, it is so much cheaper than nut milk, secondly because it is so much easier to make, and thirdly it gives a really amazing creamy texture to recipes without adding a very distinctive taste. What’s more, making your own oat milk has a huge advantage over nut milks because no electric equipment is needed. None at all!

Oats are so great for you and I honestly have to have a bottle of this in my fridge at all times!

This milk goes perfectly with our Raspberry Granola!

If you recreate any of my recipes don’t forget to tag me #LiviasKitchen


How to Make Oat Milk Like Oatly

Everyone seems to be losing their minds over the ongoing Oatly shortage so I thought I’d show you how easy and cheap it is to just make it yourself. All you need is oats, a neutral oil, salt, and water.

Soak 1 cup oats in water for a 3-4 hours, until it’s soft like overnight oats. Rinse in a mesh sieve and toss in your blender.

(If you’re looking for gluten-free oats, Bob’s Red Mill is a good brand you can find at the grocery store, but I usually buy this giant 41oz bag of oats on Amazon.)

Add 2 tbsp of a neutral-tasting oil to the blender. Oatly uses rapeseed oil, aka canola oil, but I prefer to avoid this in homemade goods because it’s pro-inflammatory (the way it’s processed in the US). Plus, vegetables don’t make oil. (See comments for discussions on this.)

I used walnut oil, but you can do avocado oil or something similar that’s liquid at room temperature. Oil isn’t required but it’s what Oatly uses. When we blend it up, it will emulsify and help add to the creaminess.

Add 3-4 cups of water (3 will be super creamy, 4 will thin it out a bit more, it’s up to your desired texture), a pinch of salt, and maybe even a little vanilla extract if you wanna get fancy.

Blend it on high, strain it through a mesh bag (this is the one I use), pour in your coffee, and stop harassing the poor barista who has no idea when the next shipment is coming in.

I don’t usually share calorie info but am doing so just for comparison to Oatly’s product. If you do 4 cups, this comes out to 54 calories per 100 ml (that’s almost 1/4 cup), which is about the same as Oatly (57 cals for them). Enjoy!

(April 2020 quarantine edit: If you’re looking for more recipes that rely on non-perishable foods, here’s a recipe book of 20 pantry meals and snacks!)

(December 2020 bored-in-quarantine recipe-development edit: Try this Blueberry Lavender Oat Milk version!)

(April 2021 Oatly: The New Coke update: These are my thoughts on that article. Long story short, homemade is still preferred for me!)


Oat milk ingredients

  • 1 cup oats (100 g)
  • 3 to 4 cups water (750 ml to 1l)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
  • 1 to 2 tbsp maple syrup or 1 to 2 Medjool dates (optional)
  • A pinch of salt (optional)

Instructions

  1. Pour out your oats into a container/bowl and then soak them (you can leave them overnight if you want to).
  2. The next day, drain the water from the oats and rinse them through.
  3. Get rid of the water they’ve been soaking in.
  4. Add the oats, 3 to 4 cups of clean water (750 ml to 1l) and all maple syrup or dates and salt to a blender and blend the mixture until it’s smooth. Add more or less water depending on how thick you want the consistency of your oat milk to be.
  5. Strain the milk using a cheesecloth, strainer, napkin or nut milk bag.
  6. Store your oat milk in an airtight container in the fridge.
  7. Enjoy it for up to five days!

Homemade oat milk, best recipes and tricks

Many people are surprised when they first make oat milk with Vegan Milker. The homemade milk is denser than the industrial version (the one in brick) and when you heat it up, the natural version gets even thicker… “Why is this happening? Am I doing it right?” they ask. The answer is yes. To better understand what’s happening we answer the following question:

Why does homemade oat milk thicken?

Oats, just like chia and flax, contain a type of fiber called mucilage that acts as a natural thickener. Mucilage is activated by heat and prolonged soaking. In the process of making industrial plant milk, when the drink is subjected to the pasteurization process many nutrients in the seed disappear or are transformed.

In the process of pasteurization, the mucilage in the oats breaks its complex fibrous sugar chain and is transformed into simple sugars, which we know as glucose. For this reason, industrial oat milk, besides being very sweet, has completely lost the thickening capacity provided by the natural fiber.

Anyway, if you are looking for a lighter texture, it is very easy to get it.

Practical advice for controlling the viscosity of oat milk:

In the oat milk basic recipe we propose to use 50gr of rolled oat for one liter of hot water between 60-70º (plus the flavourings: salt, dates, cinnamon, coconut, cocoa, etc.)

When we respect the basic proportions, we obtain a full-bodied milk, denser than the industrial one, but it will not thicken exaggeratedly when we heat it up to drink.

Most people fall in love with this recipe, and more with its traditional version with a little cinnamon and lemon zest, but if you are looking for a less dense and more liquid or lighter oat milk, pay attention to the ideas we have been collecting thanks to the Vegan Milker community’s collaborations.

What can I do to make oat milk more liquid?

  • Trick 1: Lower the processing temperature. Replace hot water (60ºC) with warm water (30ºC) or natural water. The thermal change reduces the activation of the mucilage and allows us to obtain lighter milk. The lower the water temperature, more liquid will be the milk.
  • Trick 2: LawRight method, reduce the amount of oats: This collaborator, in her searching for the perfect oat milk, besides using natural water, proposes us to reduce the measure of oats to 40 gr (3 spoonful) and add 1 pitted date, cinnamon and salt. In both cases, the more liquid the resulting milk is, more evident becomes the sedimentation. We will see that after a few minutes the oats go to the bottom and separate, so you have to shake well before serving. With hot water at 60ºC, however, when the fiber is activated, the result is a creamier milk that does not sediment so much and remains more bound. But, don’t worry because we also have a trick to avoid sedimentation. Sunflower lecithin is an ingredient that we have discovered thanks to Peter, which serves to improve the emulsion and prolong the conservation of the milk.
  • Trick 3: Peter Piper method with natural emulsifier: Peter’s proposal, after many trials to find his ideal liquid oat milk is: 1) use cold water, 2) do not soak the oat, 3) do not beat the mixture more than 40 seconds and 4) add a spoonful of sunflower lecithin so the milk emulsifies well and does not separate during the rest.

The key is to play with the temperature of the water and the quantity of rolled oats until you find the ideal texture for each taste. Small variations offer very different results.

I would like a more concentrated milk. How do I get it?

We can add up to 100 gr of rolled oat per liter of water. The water should be natural, as 100 g of oats when heated can generate too much thickness. For the same reason, in this concentrated version, great care must be taken when heating up the milk so that it does not become a pudding.

There are several alternatives for all tastes. A few years ago, we published an article encouraging the replacement of water with teas providing milk with the medicinal properties of interesting aromatic herbs and special flavours.

Personally, and out of habit, I am making versions, one day with massala tea, another day adding sunflower seeds, another day with a teaspoon of sesame… as you can see, it depends on the tastes of each one and what we feel like at each moment. I encourage you to experiment until you find your favourite.

Let’s continue to clarify the usual doubts about homemade oat milk:

Do we have to soak the oat before making the milk?

It is not necessary to soak the rolled oats to prepare the milk. Soaking also helps to activate the mucilage, but in the case of oats, the effect produced by this route is not very significant.

Could oat milk be made from raw grain?

If you are interested in trying the different alternatives you may find the idea of making oat milk from raw grain attractive. After several trials we have achieved a recipe that is highly valued by people who prefer to use raw seed. The result is a creamier and sweeter milk than the one obtained from rolled oat you may be surprised by the result!

Can oat milk be heated?

Of course, oat milk and all homemade plant milks can be heated up, but be careful how you do it, because there are small details that are crucial to enjoy our milk in good condition.

Let’s heat the milk up in the microwave or in the traditional saucepan, we must avoid it to boil. This is very important, because when oat milk boils, the mucilage is activated, the milk will thickens a lot and lose its liquid texture to become a cream or bechamel. This can be done deliberately depending on the culinary objective we have in mind, but if the idea is to drink the oat milk, it is advisable to heat it up over medium heat and stir the milk well so that the fiber does not stick to the bottom.

Can you cook with oat milk?

It is a perfect milk for culinary use. It can be used as an ingredient for pasta, biscuits, like any other plant milk.

But unlike others, making the defect its virtue, the mucilage present in oat milk makes it ideal for making a bechamel, a thick chocolate, some custards, or vegetarian creams.

What do we do with the pulp?

Be careful not to forget to use the pulp, as it can be used to prepare a variety of dishes in the healthy cook. We have made a summary of the best recipes in this article entitled “Easy recipes to recycle the leftover oat milk pulpe“.

You already have what you need to make your homemade oat milk, besides being healthy, attractive to the palate. Time to experiment and enjoy the new textures and flavours. Cheers!


Homemade oat milk, best recipes and tricks

Many people are surprised when they first make oat milk with Vegan Milker. The homemade milk is denser than the industrial version (the one in brick) and when you heat it up, the natural version gets even thicker… “Why is this happening? Am I doing it right?” they ask. The answer is yes. To better understand what’s happening we answer the following question:

Why does homemade oat milk thicken?

Oats, just like chia and flax, contain a type of fiber called mucilage that acts as a natural thickener. Mucilage is activated by heat and prolonged soaking. In the process of making industrial plant milk, when the drink is subjected to the pasteurization process many nutrients in the seed disappear or are transformed.

In the process of pasteurization, the mucilage in the oats breaks its complex fibrous sugar chain and is transformed into simple sugars, which we know as glucose. For this reason, industrial oat milk, besides being very sweet, has completely lost the thickening capacity provided by the natural fiber.

Anyway, if you are looking for a lighter texture, it is very easy to get it.

Practical advice for controlling the viscosity of oat milk:

In the oat milk basic recipe we propose to use 50gr of rolled oat for one liter of hot water between 60-70º (plus the flavourings: salt, dates, cinnamon, coconut, cocoa, etc.)

When we respect the basic proportions, we obtain a full-bodied milk, denser than the industrial one, but it will not thicken exaggeratedly when we heat it up to drink.

Most people fall in love with this recipe, and more with its traditional version with a little cinnamon and lemon zest, but if you are looking for a less dense and more liquid or lighter oat milk, pay attention to the ideas we have been collecting thanks to the Vegan Milker community’s collaborations.

What can I do to make oat milk more liquid?

  • Trick 1: Lower the processing temperature. Replace hot water (60ºC) with warm water (30ºC) or natural water. The thermal change reduces the activation of the mucilage and allows us to obtain lighter milk. The lower the water temperature, more liquid will be the milk.
  • Trick 2: LawRight method, reduce the amount of oats: This collaborator, in her searching for the perfect oat milk, besides using natural water, proposes us to reduce the measure of oats to 40 gr (3 spoonful) and add 1 pitted date, cinnamon and salt. In both cases, the more liquid the resulting milk is, more evident becomes the sedimentation. We will see that after a few minutes the oats go to the bottom and separate, so you have to shake well before serving. With hot water at 60ºC, however, when the fiber is activated, the result is a creamier milk that does not sediment so much and remains more bound. But, don’t worry because we also have a trick to avoid sedimentation. Sunflower lecithin is an ingredient that we have discovered thanks to Peter, which serves to improve the emulsion and prolong the conservation of the milk.
  • Trick 3: Peter Piper method with natural emulsifier: Peter’s proposal, after many trials to find his ideal liquid oat milk is: 1) use cold water, 2) do not soak the oat, 3) do not beat the mixture more than 40 seconds and 4) add a spoonful of sunflower lecithin so the milk emulsifies well and does not separate during the rest.

The key is to play with the temperature of the water and the quantity of rolled oats until you find the ideal texture for each taste. Small variations offer very different results.

I would like a more concentrated milk. How do I get it?

We can add up to 100 gr of rolled oat per liter of water. The water should be natural, as 100 g of oats when heated can generate too much thickness. For the same reason, in this concentrated version, great care must be taken when heating up the milk so that it does not become a pudding.

There are several alternatives for all tastes. A few years ago, we published an article encouraging the replacement of water with teas providing milk with the medicinal properties of interesting aromatic herbs and special flavours.

Personally, and out of habit, I am making versions, one day with massala tea, another day adding sunflower seeds, another day with a teaspoon of sesame… as you can see, it depends on the tastes of each one and what we feel like at each moment. I encourage you to experiment until you find your favourite.

Let’s continue to clarify the usual doubts about homemade oat milk:

Do we have to soak the oat before making the milk?

It is not necessary to soak the rolled oats to prepare the milk. Soaking also helps to activate the mucilage, but in the case of oats, the effect produced by this route is not very significant.

Could oat milk be made from raw grain?

If you are interested in trying the different alternatives you may find the idea of making oat milk from raw grain attractive. After several trials we have achieved a recipe that is highly valued by people who prefer to use raw seed. The result is a creamier and sweeter milk than the one obtained from rolled oat you may be surprised by the result!

Can oat milk be heated?

Of course, oat milk and all homemade plant milks can be heated up, but be careful how you do it, because there are small details that are crucial to enjoy our milk in good condition.

Let’s heat the milk up in the microwave or in the traditional saucepan, we must avoid it to boil. This is very important, because when oat milk boils, the mucilage is activated, the milk will thickens a lot and lose its liquid texture to become a cream or bechamel. This can be done deliberately depending on the culinary objective we have in mind, but if the idea is to drink the oat milk, it is advisable to heat it up over medium heat and stir the milk well so that the fiber does not stick to the bottom.

Can you cook with oat milk?

It is a perfect milk for culinary use. It can be used as an ingredient for pasta, biscuits, like any other plant milk.

But unlike others, making the defect its virtue, the mucilage present in oat milk makes it ideal for making a bechamel, a thick chocolate, some custards, or vegetarian creams.

What do we do with the pulp?

Be careful not to forget to use the pulp, as it can be used to prepare a variety of dishes in the healthy cook. We have made a summary of the best recipes in this article entitled “Easy recipes to recycle the leftover oat milk pulpe“.

You already have what you need to make your homemade oat milk, besides being healthy, attractive to the palate. Time to experiment and enjoy the new textures and flavours. Cheers!


Reviews

An update--I thought I had done the trick with the Ninja (see below) but, no. The next morning I took out my oat milk to add to my coffee and found it had separated. I shook it well, but the result was a bit thick and sludgy with a slimy mouthfeel in my latte. Back to the drawing board. I didn't down rate this recipe because I think it is probably my equipment at issue.

This may help those who didn't care for this but who really like oat milk. I don't have a Vitamix, so I desperately tried this in a regular blender--terrible. My brilliant husband reminded me that we have a Ninja, rarely used in the back of the cupboard. I made a half recipe in two batches--great! The a tiny pinch of salt and a dab of honey add a lot of depth, so don't leave them out! It's not messy to make at all and quite easy. I use oat milk in my coffee every morning and am hoping this will reduce my plastic waste.

Holy Cow! I made this oat milk as a substitute for milk for a birthday cake I was making for a lactose intolerant child. After blending the soaked oats and clean water I put it through a fine sieve. The very fine “silt” that was left (about 2/3 cup) I put in the microwave with about a quarter cup of the oat milk and a tablespoon of maple syrup. I heated for a minute on high, stirred in a bit more oat milk and I had Maypo! You have to be a certain age to remember that instant oatmeal cereal from the 50’s and 60’s, but as soon as I tasted it, I was sure. So was my husband. The texture and flavour were instantly identifiable.

before making this I had never tried oatmilk I was more of an almond gal but this recipe UGHH SO GOOD! I added some cinnamon and a bit more maple syrup because I planned to put it in my coffee, definitely a better (creamyyy) consistency than almond.

This turned out creamy for me. My guess is you need a powerful blender (Vitamix, Ninja, etc.) and that poor review was due to that.

I used Bob's Red Mill extra thick rolled oats, soaked for a full hour, rinsed once, blended for 2 minutes, and strained all as directed. It turned out well. Nice oat flavor and a pleasant thickness and creaminess.

Thanks for that review. I won't waste my ingredients.

Ughhh wow this is awful! I thought it would be creamy - this is not that.


Homemade Oat Milk Recipe

From the department of Saving Money By Making Things From Scratch — the same department that campaigned for homemade hummus a couple of months ago — comes this public service announcement: preparing homemade oat milk is very easy and very cheap.

I don’t drink milk myself — oat or otherwise — but I use oat milk as an ingredient regularly, in this vanilla oat milk tapioca pudding or in this Swiss chard gratin, but also to make pastry cream for strawberry tartlets, or to whip up a batch of crêpes.

If you want to make homemade oat milk, there are several ways to go about it. You can start from rolled oats, from oat flour, or from oat groats, i.e. the dehulled grain of the plant. I like to use the latter (available from natural food stores) as they are the least processed of the three, and give the best results flavor- and texture-wise.

How to prepare homemade oat milk

All you need to do then is soak the oats overnight, cook them (or not, if you choose to make raw oat milk), blitz them with water and a little salt in a blender or food processor, and then strain.

From the department of Saving Money By Making Things From Scratch comes this public service announcement: making your own oat milk is very easy and very cheap.

Oat milk made from oat groats has a very pleasant texture, smooth and milky, with a richer mouthfeel than most non-dairy milks.

I will note that the raw version has a distinctive flavor that I would describe as grassy, and a bit of a bite, which you may or may not like. I personally wouldn’t drink it straight up (then again I don’t drink milk) but I use it in preparations that call for boiling or simmering the milk, which takes the edge off. The cooked version has a much milder flavor, one I very much enjoy, and it’s the one I use for crêpes, for instance.

The bonus byproduct of homemade oat milk is the oat pulp that remains in the sieve after you’ve strained the milk this is sometimes referred to as okara by analogy with the soy milk making process. It is quite nutritious, so it would be foolish to toss it: if you’ve cooked the oats, you can eat it as porridge if you’re into that sort of thing, but if you haven’t or you aren’t, you can fold it into cake or muffin batters, or add it to bread dough, as I do.

Just to drive home my point about the money one saves by doing this: in my organic store, I can buy a package of 500 grams (17.6 ounces) of oat groats for 1.65€ ($2.45). This amount allows me to make 10 liters (10 quarts) of oat milk, which ends up costing 0.16€ (.24) per liter (if you cook the oats, a few cents should be added to account for the energy needed to run the stove for 40 minutes). By comparison, a carton of oat milk sold at the same organic store costs about 2€ ($3) per liter, in other words twelve times more.

Factor in the environmental cost of packaging and transporting the oat milk (which is mostly water) rather than the dried grain, and then transporting and recycling the carton (so much the better if you can buy oat groats in bulk I can’t), and you have a pretty strong incentive to make your own.



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